Voodoo Amulets and their Loas

Loas are exceedingly strong and powerful nature spirits or gods or spirits, who originally rooted in a human being with special qualities. They are represented in veves, drawn on the floor, or in the sand, or sigils are used.

 

These sigils are engraved in ruby or emerald or written on parchment in the wearers own blood to become a talisman for certain wishes, qualities or actions. Engraved ruby or emerald talismans should be worn in a red flannel or chamois sack. Men must carry them in their right pocket and women should wear them between their breasts, suspended by a cotton string or fine golden chain.

The engraving or drawing of the talismans should take place after sunset, close to midnight on a moonless night.

The following talisman-figures are just a small selection of many.

 

Loa Gran Bois
Clears up all feelings of confusion

Loa Gran Bois Clears up all feelings of confusion

 

Loa Dahn
Brings the wearer and his associates tremendous wealth

Loa Dahn Brings the wearer and his associates tremendous wealth

 

Loa Ibo
Helps the wearer to fulfill all responsibilities

Loa Ibo Helps the wearer to fulfill all responsibilities

 

Loa Marinette
Protects the wearer against sickness

Loa Marinette Protects the wearer against sickness

 

 

Loa Ezili-Freda-Dahomey
Leads the wearer to sensual pleasures

Loa Ezili-Freda-Dahomey Leads the wearer to sensual pleasures

 

Loa Zaka
Helps the crops to grow when you are a farmer

Loa Zaka Helps the crops to grow when you are a farmer

 

Loa Pierre-Boucassin
Attracts the opposite sex to the wearer

Loa Pierre-Boucassin Attracts the opposite sex to the wearer

 

Loa Onzoncaire
Helps the wearer to accomplish anything he or she desires

Loa Onzoncaire


 

VAMzzz Publishing book:

Voodoos and Obeahs: Phases of West India Witchcraft by the Jesuit anthropologist Joseph J. Williams (1875-1940) offers a careful documentation of the history and ethnography of Voodoo and reveals the connection of both Haitian Voodoo and Jamaican Obeah to snake worship (ophioletreia). In Jamaica, Obeah is the general term to denote those Africans who in the island practice witchcraft or sorcery. Williams includes numerous quotations from rare documents and books on the topic. This work goes into great depth concerning the New World-African connection and is highly recommended if you want a deep understanding of the dramatic historical background of Haitian and Jamaican magic and witchcraft, and the profound influence of imperialism, slavery and racism on its development.

 

Voodoos and Obeahs
Phases of West India Witchcraft
by Joseph J. Williams

English
ISBN 9789492355119
Paperback, book size 148 x 210 mm
374 pages

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